Tag Archives: Beatles history

Book Review: “The Beatles 100: One Hundred Pivotal Moments in Beatles History” by John M. Borack

This review is by Amy Hughes…

The Beatles 100: One Hundred Pivotal Moments in Beatles History John M. Borack

One of the first 100 things you’ll ask about John Borack’s book The Beatles 100: One Hundred Pivotal Moments in Beatles History (Rarebird Books, 2021): are they actually pivotal? Do they carry that weight, to coin a lyric.

On one hand, any narrative that hinges on The Beatles’ most important moments can be considered subjective. I’m more than sure that while perusing each chapter, you as the reader/Beatles factoid gatherer/historian could compile your own list and match it to author Borack’s condensed history.

What I considered relevant were that the moments were not in chronological order, nor was the book confined to The Beatles’ inner orbit. Several passages at length called out the solo years and in that context, how each contributed to the canon of post-Beatles history.

Borack addresses the better known episodes in Beatledom: Hamburg, Love Me Do, Pete Best, Ed Sullivan, Shea Stadium, MBE’s, the Paul Is Dead hoax and even the Mono LP Box Set release. However, he also ruminates over numerous chapters concerning their solo careers and lives: Paul losing Linda tying into Run Devil Run; John and Yoko’s Double Fantasy leading into John’s death; George’s marital issues with first wife Pattie running into his 1974 Dark Horse album and subsequent tour and Ringo forming his All-Starr Band. Each chapter is headed by a quotation from a random Beatle or associate applicable to the subject matter.

While the events showcased are familiar, the narrative is casual and readable. I would not consider this a “list” so to speak, nor is it a perfunctory bulleted style treatise, pointing the reader in any certain direction. Choosing what moments to delve into is probably the most important note for anyone engaged in learning something more than superficial facts.

I will state that Borack does spend considerable time and effort in stating where most of the stories come from: mostly interviews with the press and such. A good load of quotes are coming directly from The Beatles Anthology and from Paul, his book by Barry Miles. There are also a number of rock press quotes as well, especially in context to the time of album releases from the group or in the solo years.

Overall, I found the book a good reference read and for a nice epilogue, Borack gives us his opinion on solo tracks, cover versions, and soundalikes. With all that said and sung…

I’m giving this book 4 out of 4 beetles

 

 

 

 

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Book Review: “Visualizing The Beatles: A Complete Graphic History of the World’s Favorite Band” by John Pring and Rob Thomas

I consider myself extremely lucky to have gotten an advanced copy of Visualizing The Beatles: A Complete Graphic History of the World’s Favorite Band by John Pring and Rob Thomas. Visualizing The Beatles John Pring Rob ThomasThis beautiful and colorful 288 page book is being released today, May 1, 2018, and you really need to see it to believe it. If you click through on the link, Amazon has 6 images available, but they just don’t seem to do the book justice. I did my best to snap some photos of some of the pages, but even these don’t project the visual appeal contained in the pages of this book.

Visualizing the Beatles take readers through the history (and trivia) of the Beatles with color filled graphics like you’ve never seen. Whoever came up with the concepts of each section has one of the most creative minds I’ve ever seen. Even the albums are broken down with who wrote, sang or played on each song. Also included are graphs about famous locations around London that they lived, set lists from concerts and their work after post Beatles.

I admit that this book may not be for everyone. It’s most likely suited for the newer Beatles fans, but I do think every Beatles fan should at least give it a look if you can get your hands on a copy (ask your local librarian if they can get a copy from another library for you to check out if they don’t have one).

Authors John Pring and Rob Thomas really did their homework on this book. In my opinion, this isn’t some half-ass’d effort to cash in on the Fab Four. This is a unique and stylish way to appeal to a new generation of Beatles fans. And for that reason…

I rate this book, 4 out of 4 Beatles!

 

 

 

 

 

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