Tag Archives: Paul McCartney

Book Review: “Little Wing: The Jimmy McCulloch Story” by Paul Salley

Little Wing Jimmy McCulloch Paul Salley

Another fine review written by Amy Hughes

Rock guitarists have the unenviable task of comparison, either as mass media idols or underrated geniuses who didn’t get peer recognition during their lifetime. A handful thankfully straddle both hemispheres and if needed, get that extra push by someone who will deep dive into their life & career and emerge with an appreciation that wasn’t there before.

Author (and fan) Paul Salley has brought forth the heart in Little Wing: The Jimmy McCulloch Story (Lotown Publishing, 2021). No one reading this blog should not know McCulloch’s time with Paul McCartney: he was Wings’ lead guitarist from 1974 to 1977 and contributed several defining moments to songs in that time period, most notably the soaring interludes and name-dropped solo in “Junior’s Farm” and the highlight breaks in the live version of “Maybe I’m Amazed” from ‘Wings Over America.’ However, what overshadows all his accomplishments was his sudden death in 1979 at age 26.

As a young child, McCulloch showed himself as a guitar prodigy that belied his stature, literally. Born in Scotland, he was a ‘wee lad’ and many remembrances of him from those much older (including brother Jack) are often laced with warm humor: that he could even hold a guitar are among the repeated stories from his youth.

Coming from a musical family, McCulloch began his vocation with Jack in the local band The Jaygars. Rising in popularity across the UK, they were astonished at the reception and attention that McCulloch (at age 11 in 1964) was receiving. He caught the ear of The Who’s Pete Townshend, which would prove fortuitous in a few short years.

Moving onto another band configuration (One In A Million), the McCulloch brothers were soon on the rise as recording artists with a move to London in 1967. After their band split in early 1968, Jimmy McCulloch the guitarist transformed into Jimmy McCulloch the guitarist with a Number 1 hit. Townshend brought together McCulloch, singer-drummer-songwriter Speedy Keen and pianist Andy Newman to form Thunderclap Newman. The Who’s guitarist wanted to foster a creative environment with musicians he found favor with (Keen had written “Armenia City In The Sky” for ‘The Who Sell Out’) and this quirky ensemble fit the bill. With Townshend as producer, the trio recorded a Keen original “Something In The Air.” The song was released in July 1969 and McCulloch became the youngest person (at 16) to top the UK charts.

While Thunderclap Newman wrestled with the notion of becoming a performing band (and eventually added Jack McCulloch on drums and Jim Avery on bass), the pressures of living up to the newly minted status of rock stars began to take its toll. A 1970 album did emerge (‘Hollywood Dream’), gigs on the road brought notice and television appearances helped elevate McCulloch’s presence, but his commitment to the group began to falter. A summer 1971 US tour with The Who would have brought them high recognition; instead, Thunderclap Newman quietly disbanded.

McCulloch was finding his feet within the world of UK rock, however his next big move – working and touring with John Mayall – had an enormous impact on his post as a guitarist. Within three days of a phone call, McCulloch was on stage in Germany playing the blues next to the legendary statesman, who remarked later that McCulloch “had a lot of potential as an individual stylist.”

A short-lived namesake group was a time-filler for McCulloch’s next spotlight gig: Stone The Crows. Having tragically lost guitarist Les Harvey in a freak on-stage electrocution, the band were seeking out a replacement. McCulloch came to an audition and impressed everyone, especially vocalist Maggie Bell. His debut in May 1972 and his work on their album-in-progress further showcased his ability to interpret a back catalog on tour (the band’s forte) and break out from the cage of ‘teen idol.’ His position ended in 1973… however there were better days ahead.

McCulloch’s tenure in Wings began with a serendipitous invite from McCartney to attend a recording session in Paris to work on solo tracks for Linda McCartney (which were released on her posthumous ‘Wide Prairie’). This friendly venture set off the chain of events that saw McCulloch work with the band on Mike McCartney’s 1974 release ‘McGear’ (now acknowledged as a ‘lost’ Wings album), which morphed into the new lineup that included drummer Geoff Britton, the McCartneys and Denny Laine.

The group relocated to Nashville in June of 1974 to begin rehearsals, find their chemistry and jell musically. While there was plenty of time to play and relax, McCulloch did catch some trouble with the law with a bit of arrogance that wasn’t appreciated by the local authorities. Although proving himself worthy of a callout in the hard rocking “Junior’s Farm,” the cracks were already showing. During a brief respite, McCulloch nearly left, tempted by an offer to join The James Gang. His reasoning (no official tour plans akin to a lifestyle he enjoyed) nearly spelled the end of his tenure with McCartney. However, when Linda McCartney stepped in (and the offer of a wage arose), McCulloch felt secure enough to stay aboard for the foreseeable future.

The public’s first viewing of the new line-up in November 1974 with the release of “Junior’s Farm/Sally G” and the ensuing sleeve photoshoot, (with McCulloch dressed as a gambler) garnered strong notices in the rock press. His addition to the group reinforced McCartney’s new direction: take this band seriously and by the way, we’re kicking ass as well. Unfortunately, by the time the group were setting up for the ‘Venus and Mars’ sessions, Britton was out.

His replacement – Joe English – slotted in on a recommendation from Wings’ horn player Tony Dorsey. With the group in formation, they alighted in New Orleans during Mardi Gras for the recordings at Sea Saint Studio. ‘Venus and Mars’ dropped in May 1975, shooting to the top of the charts in both the UK and US on the strength of “Listen To What The Man Said.” McCulloch’s contribution “Medicine Jar” (not autobiographical, but inspired but a close friend’s drug addiction) was a hard-rock number and his understated blues-tinged licks on the closing tracks “Treat Her Gently/Lonely Old People” were highlights as was Wings’ reinterpretation of the theme to the popular UK series ‘Crossroads’ with McCulloch’s lone voice signing off: “That’s basically it.”

With a solid line-up in place, Wings started rehearsals in the summer, with the intention of hitting the road. The official launch of what would become ‘Wings Over The World’ started in September and met with fan and critical acclaim, including much McCulloch family love when the band hit his hometown of Glasgow, an indication that life was very good for ‘the boy down the road.’ The break over Christmastime and subsequent reconvening in January 1976 for the next album ‘At The Speed Of Sound,’ with McCulloch’s anti-drug composition ‘Wino Junko’ (with it’s ethereal almost wistful melody) wound its way into and around a concepted ‘showcase’ album for each member. The subsequent European dates came off without a hitch, but the US leg was delayed after McCulloch slipped in his Paris hotel bathroom and broke his hand.

The US audiences that experienced those gigs in 1976 saw a band on fire. However, as was the case with alot of what was going on in the rock world of the ‘70s, McCulloch seemed to have a hard time adjusting. To many, he was the whiz kid from Glasgow that had superstardom thrust upon him. Some close friends acknowledged he was a “complex soul” who had a quiet introverted side that juxtaposed with the stroppy Scotsman who’s drinking brought out a gregarious, immature personality. However the overall sentiment from those who had noticed his immense talent was akin to being a parent. As Pete Townshend said, “I was so proud of him.”

McCulloch’s time with Wings now appears to be pre-ordained to end as quickly as it started. While he never seemed comfortable with downtime, his orbit of musician-friends and family had him in gatherings such as White Line and sessions with Roger Daltrey. While there was rampant speculation he was on the outs with McCartney, the 1976 triple album ‘Wings Over America’ (which showcased McCulloch’s standout work on “Maybe I’m Amazed”) dovetailed into the next scheduled Wings project in February 1977. The recording of ‘London Town’ on boats in the Virgin Islands proved precarious at times and when the sessions moved back to the McCartney farm in Scotland in August, McCulloch’s (and English’s) tenure with Wings would soon be over.

The accounts vary from source to source on why and how the split came, but most agree that McCulloch was growing restless and felt that his position should be one of peer recognition and fair compensation. As there would be no touring in the foreseeable future (due to Linda McCartney’s pregnancy), McCulloch took this as note and while he played on several of the farm sessions (one of which resulted in “Mull of Kintyre”), he and English were not part of the ensuing promotion for ‘London Town’s’ release in March 1978. McCulloch had flown Wings.

He was not without a band for long. McCulloch joined the reunited Small Faces and with Steve Marriott, he slotted in beside the fiery guitarist/vocalist. Alongside drummer Kenney Jones, bassist Rick Wills and keyboardist Ian McLagan, they hopped onto gigs in September 1977 and cranked out ‘78 In The Shade.’ Yet with no real original contributions forthcoming, McCulloch once again bade farewell to a band setting.

Most of 1978 and 1979 saw McCulloch moving between projects he either contributed to (charity gigs, testing new guitar technology) or joining up with old colleagues in the hopes of moving on from the shadow of Wings. With The Dukes, that prospect seemed positive and after a spate of gigs in the summer and an album release, the fall of ‘79 was a time to look forward with a Dukes tour.

But that was not to be. McCulloch was found motionless in his London apartment by his brother Jack on September 27. He was 26 years old. Although he had been prescribed medications for various issues, the official cause of death was morphine poisoning. While Jack and close friends believe it was accidental, the circumstances up to and surrounding his death have and will remain a tragedy that can’t be fully explained.

For a large majority of this biography, Salley has remained focused on McCulloch’s brief, but enormous contributions as a guitarist, bandmate, friend and brother. He has included dozens of unseen photos, memorabilia, clippings, interviews, discography, gear gallery and tributes exclusive to this book and with the addition of editor/designer Mark Cunningham, they have put together a visual and tonal layout that elevates this above the run-of-the-mill term ‘self-published.’

For the hard work and details that show throughout and lovingly dedicated to ‘Jimmy Mac,’…

I give this biography 4 out 4 beetles.

 

 

 

 

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Book Review: “My Private Lennon” by Sibbie O’Sullivan

I need to be honest, I really wasn’t expecting much when I bought a copy of My Private Lennon: Explorations from a Fan Who Never Screamed by Sibbie O’Sullivan. I believe the book came up as a recommendation on Amazon while I was perusing other books. “Another fan book…”, I thought. But, it was only 165 pages long and was published February 17, 2020, making it current. Why not…I need to start reading and reviewing more books.

Reading this wasn’t like reading just another fan book. Yes, she and her friends talked endlessly about the Beatles. Yes, she had teen magazines about the Fab Four. And yes, she did see the Beatles during a dress rehearsal at the Ed Sullivan theater in August 1965, an event she has barely any memory of except for the photo she took of John Lennon on stage. And YES, this book is so much more than just another fan book.

Sibbie O’Sullivan weaves her personal life in with the stories of the Beatles, their wives and their own personal life choices. And she does it in a brutally honest way. She tells stories of the innocence of being a teenager to becoming sexually promiscuous, a shotgun wedding, divorce, friends, family, etc. She ties her stories in with the feelings of Cynthia, John & Yoko, but in a way to show how she can relate to what they must have been feeling at the time. Her stories are told so much deeper, more emotional and grown-up than other Beatle fan books that’s I’ve read. Honestly, and maybe it’s the voyeur in me, but I couldn’t put this books down. I even believe that if she had left the Beatles out of it, it still would be a great read. By the time I finish, I thought, “I hope she feels better now”. It’s a beautifully written memoir. And for that reason…

I rate this book, 4 out of 4 Beetles!

 

 

 

 

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Book Review: “Lennon vs. McCartney: The Beatles, inter-band relationships and the hidden messages to each other in their song lyrics” by Adam Thomas

Lennon vs McCartney The Beatles, inter-band relationships and the hidden messages to each other in their song lyrics Adam ThomasI guess I was browsing around Facebook (or maybe it was on Twitter) a couple weeks ago when I saw the author, Adam Thomas, of Lennon vs. McCartney: The Beatles, inter-band relationships and the hidden messages to each other in their song lyrics post about his book being half price on the publishers website, so I thought I’d give it a go since it seemed like a topic that I hadn’t fully delved into where the Fab Four are concerned.

This book was self-published in November 2014 but is able to withstand the test of time since it starts back at the very beginning of the Beatles career and because there are now only two original Beatles who are still with us here on earth. Paul and Ringo still may write songs about their heydays as Beatles, but most of it is reflective and nostalgic with very little, if any, controversy.

This book is only about 200 pages, but does a great job of pointing out the songs that Lennon and McCartney wrote about each other (both good and bad), both during their time as a writing team and after the split up of the band. The one problem that I found with Adam Thomas’ presentation of this material was that he very rarely quoted the lyrics of the songs and instead would just give his interpretation of what was contained in it. I can only guess that he did to avoid dealing with any copyright issues, but unless you know the words to every Lennon and McCartney song ever written, it can be a little trying. Still, he does do a great job explaining the meaning behind the songs. And…not only does he analyze John and Paul’s hidden messages, he also takes on Ringo and George’s work as well.

The first hundred pages of this book are about the songs in question and the second half of this book is a charted “Relationship Timeline”. I’ll admit that I haven’t read through the time-line yet, but I’ll get to it in the very near future. After reading the first half, I think it’s obvious that Adam Thomas did his homework for this book. And for that reason…

I rate this book, 4 out of 4 Beatles!

 

 

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Book Review: “Maharishi and Me: Seeking Enlightenment with the Beatles’ Guru” by Susan Shumsky

On September 3rd, I received an email asking if I’d be interesting in being part of a Blog Tour for a new book. The subject line of the email was “NEW BOOK: The Beatles’ India – sex scandals & mental breakdowns (Inside Story)”. As a publicist who works with authors, a book that was released seven months earlier is not considered a new book…but what the hell. Also, I had the pleasure of meeting the author, Susan Shumsky, last week at the Beatles’ White Album Symposium at Monmouth University in New Jersey. I introduced myself and told her I would be reviewing her book. We had a brief conversation, I attended one of her talks and then said our goodbyes at the end of the seminar.

Maharishi & Me: Seeking Enlightenment with the Beatles’ Guru by Susan Shumsky was released on February 13, 2018.  It’s a 300+ page book about the author’s experience with the same Maharishi that the Beatles spent time with in 1968. The book is very well written and an easy read. Of course, you may get tripped up on all the Hindu terminology, but not enough to distract too much from her personal story of following and living at the ashram of the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi and practicing transcendental meditation for over 20 years.

Now for the more personal side of this review…and strictly my opinion: There are many times throughout Susan’s story that the word ‘cult’ would come to my mind. Even the author herself brings up the topic along the way, but easily finds ways of dismissing it at times. It can become almost disturbing to the reader and I still haven’t come to terms with her justification of some of the things that she brings to light about the Maharishi’s organization. Even after being kicked out of the TM organization, she still supports the Maharishi to the very end.

But was John Lennon correct when he called the Maharishi a fraud? Well, this is also left open to interpretation. Ms. Shumsky spends several chapters in the middle of her book discussing the Beatles involvement and visit to India to meet with Maharishi at his ashram. She draws the stories from other sources since she wasn’t there to obtain any first hand knowledge. She also draws upon stories from people she knows who were there. In a court of law, a lot of this would all be considered hearsay. My thought is to take what she says, along with any other sources you may have read and develop your own opinion. Or…maybe not, because in the end, does any of it really matter? I think it’s up to the reader to decide what’s right for them when it comes to their personal religious beliefs and not be influenced by celebrity endorsements…or condemnations. Even Susan says in her book that you have to find the right guru for you, so you’ll either find her story about TM impressive or disturbing.

Susan Shumsky does a great job of opening the readers eyes to the making (and life) of a guru by someone who was actually there to witness it. She tells both the good and bad. The stories of her experiences are heartwarming, funny, disturbing and told with a lot of strength. Yes, I would highly recommend that you read this book if you’re a true Beatles fans or just someone considering TM or just wants a first hand experience of what it’s like inside the ashram. It’s a book that can create a lot of discussions about gurus, religion and God. And for that reason…

I rate this book, 3 out of 4 Beetles!

 

 

 

 

***For more information on Susan Shumsky, go to www.DivineRevelations.org

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Beatles Quotes: He said what?!

After the Beatles became worldwide phenomenons, there is very little of what they said or did that didn’t get recorded in some way. From 1964 until today, whether on film, radio or print media, when a Beatles speaks…people listened! So on August 1, 1966, when Paul McCartney was interviewed on BBC’s David Frost at the Phonograph, the first minute of his interview made the front page of the Sunday Argus-Leader in Sioux Falls, SD on August 7, 1966. Amazingly, the article does a very good job of misquoting McCartney (imagine that!), so here’s a transcript of the fist minute (out of nine minutes) of the interview that this story was pulled from:

Frost: It is alleged by certain people in your organization that you’re very soon off to America. Does that fill you with delight?

McCartney: Yeah. It’s good. I enjoy it in America. I think I like England much better as a place.

Frost: Why?

McCartney: I don’t know. It’s the atitude of the people generally, in America that makes it, um, not as good a place to be as England.

Frost: Whatja mean? Uh…just sort of the intolerant or…

McCartney: Well, I don’t know really. The kind of people we meet in America tend to be…uh…you know, heads of corporations and publicity business things, so I know we don’t get a good feel of American life, but they all seem to believe that, sort of, money is it! Which is true to an extent but not all the time, ya know. They believe in it all the time!

Frost: Yeah, well, they’ve carried it all much further than we have. They’re much more efficient about it and much more frightening about it.

McCartney: Mm yeah, much more frightening!

Just to bring you all up to date, Paul McCartney currently owns no less than four properties in the U.S., including Beverly Hills, Manhattan, the Hamptons, and Arizona. And as of today (June 2018), his net worth is estimated at $1.2 billion making him the 2nd richest musician in the world behind Andrew Lloyd Weber! And let’s not forget that he’s currently married to a Jersey girl, Nancy Shevell…his second American wife.

Whaddya think of us now, Macca? Not so scary….huh?

 

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Book Review: “Baby’s In Black: Astrid Kirchherr, Stuart Sutcliffe, and The Beatles” by Arne Bellstorf

Baby's In Black Arne BellstorfBaby’s in Black: Astrid Kirchherr, Stuart Sutcliffe, and The Beatles a black and white graphic novel by German cartoonits Arne BellstorfThis hardcover book measures approximately 6″ x 9″ and is 195 pages long. It was originally published in Germany in 2010 under the title Baby’s In Black: The Story of Astrid Kirchherr and Stuart Sutcliffe, and later translated into English in 2011 and released in the U.S. in 2012 with its new title.

This is the latest graphic novel in my quest to find the ultimate Beatles graphic novel. I bought a used ex-library copy off of Amazon.com, so I can really comment on the cover since mine has plastic covering it. I will say that even though this book is in black & white, I enjoyed the artwork much more than the book I read last week in which I had a hard time telling the individual Beatles apart from the artist’s renditions. I believe the author of Baby’s In Black, Arne Bellstorf, was much better at pulling off the emotion of the characters much better than some other cartoonists who used more color and detailed drawings.

This book is the love story of Astrid Kirchherr and Beatles’ bassist Stuart Sutcliffe, from the moment they set eyes on each other at the Kaiserkeller club in Hamburg, Germany, until the day Astrid broke the news to John and Paul that Stu had died. George, Paul and John also play a big part in the story with barely a mention of Pete Best. Klaus Voormann also figures prominently in the story, as does Astrid’s mother. You have to give the author a lot of credit for getting the real Astrid Kirchherr to help in making the story as true as possible. It made it a real delight to read knowing that it came from source. And though I’m weary to label this as the ultimate Beatles graphic novel (since it’s really about Astrid and Stu), I really believe that any Beatle fan would truly enjoy this book. And for that reason…

I rate this book, 4 out of 4 Beetles!

 

 

 

 

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Book Review: “Once Upon A Time In Liverpool” by Judith Kristen and illustrated by Eric Cash

Once Upon A Time In Liverpool Judith Kristen Eric CashA book I should have read long ago when I bought it after it was first released, Once Upon a Time in Liverpool by Judith Kristen and illustrated by Eric Cash was published November 16, 2012. According to the copyright page, the printing of this book was limited to 1000 copies. You can still find new copies on Amazon and on Eric Cash’s website, so I sent a couple emails last week to find out if the book did go into a second printing, but I never got an answer.

Once Upon A Time In Liverpool is a 40 page children’s book that is as wonderful to look at as it is to read. After spending the past several weeks reading a lot of different children’s books about The Beatles, I believe this one is the must have for any parent introducing their children to the Beatles for the first time, or for any Beatles book collector. Between Eric’s amazing retro styled paintings & long history of painting the Beatles, matched with Judith’s skills at writing children’s books, these two seem to have found the right combination to tell the story properly! Each Beatle is introduced to the reader with their birth date, parents, where in Liverpool they were born and what schools they attended. The readers is then lead through each of their lives as they came together to be the Fab Four that we know today. They even include Pete Best and Stuart Sutcliff in their little book. Just Fab! And for that reason…

I rate this book, 4 out of 4 Beetles!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Book Giveaway: “Once There Was a Way: What if The Beatles Stayed Together?” by Bryce Zabel

Once There Was A Way Bryce ZabelHappy holidays readers! While surfing my way through Facebook this week, I came across a post about this book – Once There Was a Way: What If The Beatles Stayed Together?  by Bryce Zabel. Since it was just released on December 5, 2017, I decided request a review copy from the publisher, Diversion Books. After offering to send me a review copy, they wrote back to me and asked if I would like to have a contest on my site and give away three copies. “Absolutely!”, I replied.

The book is a 308 page, fictional tale of what might have happened had the Beatles remained friends and never broke up their band.  I can’t wait to read and review it for everyone, but in the meantime, here is an excerpt from the book. I choose this one because it includes one of my favorite Beatles ladies…May Pang!

 

ONCE THERE WAS A WAY – EXCERPT

Lennon Kidnapping (1974)

Once Julian was safely back to the care of his mother, Cynthia, John returned to his party life in Malibu. The Weathermen followed him constantly. Ironically, even though Lennon spotted them several times, he dismissed them as junior FBI agents and ignored them.

The nightclubs they followed him into included the famed Troubadour in Hollywood. Wearing disguises, the Weathermen observed Lennon and Nilsson throwing back Brandy Alexanders like men who had been lost in the desert for a week. One night, an inebriated Lennon came from the restrooms wearing a sanitary napkin attached to his forehead. Dohrn and Ayers watched as a waitress questioned him as to whether he was leaving a tip on the way out.

“Do you know who I am?” Lennon asked.

“Yes,” the waitress shot back. “You’re the asshole with a Kotex on your head.”

The plan had been for Dohrn and Ayers to pick up Lennon after he left the Troubadour, but now there were too many people around, from bouncers to club owners to fans gathered to watch the stumbling Lennon. If anything, the scene convinced Dohrn and Ayers that Lennon was a worthy target who would benefit from some re-education—they’d just have to wait a little longer to implement their plans.

As it turned out, they didn’t have to wait as long as they thought. The evening of March 12, 1974, had been a dark one for John Lennon, now almost a year into his banishment by Yoko Ono. Lennon and Nilsson began throwing down more cocktails and decided to heckle the Smothers Brothers, the controversial political satirists.

“The comments got so ugly and personal that we were about to get pulled off the stage,” Tommy Smothers said. “We loved the Beatles and it blew our minds that one of them would try to ruin our show.”

As the situation escalated, club security attempted to remove the drunken and enraged rock stars in the audience. The struggle turned physical, and Lennon lost his memorable glasses in the scuffle.

All of this, of course, attracted just as much attention as the Kotex incident, but this time, the Weather Underground was prepared—they had a spotter in the crowd who used a nearby payphone to call Bernardine Dohrn, stationed at another payphone near Lennon’s rental house on the beach.

As a taxi dropped off Lennon, Nilsson, and Pang at Lennon’s, a coordinated team of five members of the Weather Underground made their move to grab Lennon. Nilsson tried to hold on to his friend but was punched out cold for his bravery, suffering a concussion when his head hit the stone driveway. A car appeared, driven by Ayers, with Dohrn in the passenger seat.

Pang screamed, terrified she might be raped, and was gagged, blindfolded, and thrown into the back seat. The Weather Underground radicals overpowered Lennon as well, tied his hands with duct tape, and threw him in the trunk of the vehicle. Within less than a minute of exiting the taxi, John Lennon, inebriated and vomiting, found himself locked in a dark car trunk without his eyeglasses.

The car sped off, going north on Pacific Coast Highway. Twenty miles away, on a dark, deserted stretch of beach highway outside of Trancas, a member of the rebel group threw May Pang from the car.

It took her over two hours to find her way to an all-night liquor store with a phone. The manager, a volunteer member of the Malibu Sheriff’s Department, took care of the frantic Pang and helped her remember the physical descriptions of the assailants as best as possible.

With Pang’s assistance, deputies found Harry Nilsson shortly before daylight, still unconscious, in the driveway of the beach house. Within another hour, AP had broken the story.

***

Breaking News

APB107

-BULLETIN- (AP)

(LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA)—THE RADICAL WEATHER UNDERGROUND TERRORIST ORGANIZATION SAYS THAT MUSICIAN JOHN LENNON IS IN ITS CUSTODY. LENNON, A MEMBER OF THE POPULAR MUSICAL GROUP THE BEATLES, HAS BEEN MISSING SINCE TUESDAY.

05:18gAPD  03-15-74

APB108

LENNON-BULLETIN-TAKE 2

FBI DIRECTOR CLARENCE M. KELLEY CONFIRMS THAT BUREAU AGENTS BELIEVE THE COMMUNICATION FROM WEATHER UNDERGROUND LEADER BERNARDINE DOHRN IS AUTHENTIC.

 

Thrilling…huh?

To enter the contest to win one of three copies of Once There Was A Way, just leave a comment below and tell me what you believe may have happened (or wished had happened) if the Beatles had stayed together. One entry per person. Contest ends and winners will be announce at 9 a.m. on Sunday, December 24, 2017.

Good luck and happy holidays….and thank you to Christine at Diversion Books for giving my readers a spectacular holiday!

 

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Book Review: “High In The Clouds” by Paul McCartney

High In The Clouds Paul McCartneyHigh in the Clouds by Paul McCartney (and children’s author Philip Ardagh) is a 96 page children’s book originally released on October 3, 2005. The artwork is by award winning animator Geoff Dunbar who is the artist behind Paul McCartney’s Rupert and the Frog Chorus video and the song “We All Stand Together” (see video below).

This book is being made into a movie and is currently in pre-production according to IMDb.

From Wikipedia:

In 2013, it was reported that an animated feature film adaptation of the book was in development by producers Michael Lynne and Bob Shaye through their Unique Features banner and RGH Entertainment. Tony Bancroft was set to direct the film, written by Josh Klausner, with Paul McCartney set to compose several original songs. The film was optioned by Gaumont.

This story is about a squirrel named Wirral (yeah, just like the town across the River Mersey where Cynthia Lennon grew up), who, after his forest home of Woodland is destroyed and his mother is killed by bulldozers, is in search of the island paradise of Animalia where all the animals live free and in peace. A few other notes of interest:

  • The word FREEDOM appears in all caps which I took as a tribute to Sir Paul’s song “Freedom” that he released after the 9/11 attacks.
  • The words “We all stand together” also appears in the text. I would assume another homage. This time to the song of the same name that McCartney wrote for The Frog Chorus (video below)
  • The bad guy in this book (actually a woman) is named Gretsch! Well, that won’t win him any points with the guitar company now, will it? LOL
  • There are animals of all sizes living on Animalia.  From very large elephants and rhinos to very small….beetles!

This book is absolutely beautifully illustrated. So much so that I had wished there were more pictures to go along with the story. The story itself is good and one can imagine a child of 6 to 9 years of age (recommended age) reading this book to them self. I think my only concern would be the title “High in the Clouds”. Though there is a character in the book named Froggo who travels by hot air balloon, most of the story is on the ground, making me wonder if this is just another one of Sir Paul’s marijuana references. I mean this is the guy that wrote the love song “Gotta to Get You into My Life” about weed! And for that reason…

I rate this book, 3 out of 4 Beetles!

 

 

 

 

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Book Review: “David Bowie: A Life” by Dylan Jones

David Bowie A Life Dylan JonesI’d love to say I’ve been loving this book and speeding through it’s pages, but that would just be an outright lie because I’ve been laboring to read it for over a month! I choose this book free as part of the Blogging for Books program because I was a (late to the game) fan of Bowie’s music in the 80’s. I couldn’t get enough of Jazzin’ for Blue Jean.

David Bowie: A Life by Dylan Jones is a 521 page biography of…well…David Bowie. But it’s not your typical biography. Dylan Jones interviewed over 180 friends, family, colleagues, lovers and rivals of David Bowie. The list of contributors appears at the end of the book as the ultimate who’s who list of the rock and music industry, including Angie Bowie, Tony Visconti, Ricky Gervais, Paul McCartney and even Bowie himself. All the interviews were then broken down and placed in chronological order and presented as an oral history of the life and death of the man born as David Jones on January 8, 1947 in Brixton, U.K..

Though I started out enthusiastically reading this book, about a third of the way through it I got the feeling that a lot of the people interviewed for this book were the ultimate Bowie fans. The praising of everything he wore, sang, said or designed became overwhelming. Occasionally, the author throws in a quote from someone that pretty much amounts to, “David Bowie was a self-centered asshole!” and then the praise would start all over again. For me, it got to be too much.

At the same time, I can’t completely knock this book. This is one of the most complete and informative biographies that I’ve ever read and it really gets at the heart and soul of who David Bowie was and you will learn a lot about him in between the constant adulation of his genius and his sexual prowess.

I haven’t given up on this book yet and I will continue to read it until the end. I’m especially anxious to get to the part about his association with John Lennon and the writing of the song, “Fame“. And for that reason…

I rate this book, 3 out of 4 Beetles!

 

 

 

 

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